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Head Office in North Bay

30 Roundel Road, North Bay, Ontario, P1C 0B8

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Head Office in North Bay

30 Roundel Road, North Bay, Ontario, P1C 0B8

Request a Quote

The best at what we do..

* Please Fill Required Fields *
img

Phone

Toll Free : 1-866-206-2267

Working Hours

We are happy to meet you during our working hours. Please make an appointment.

  • Monday - Friday08:00-16:30
  • Saturday - SundayClosed

Deseret UAS Signs Landmark Agreement with ElectraFly

By admin In UAV News

21

Nov
2018

Deseret UAS Signs Landmark Agreement with ElectraFly

TOOELE CITY- Deseret UAS has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the unmanned aerial systems (UAS) company, ElectraFly. This Utah-based company is developing a personal flying vehicle that has the potential to revolutionize the unmanned aerial systems (UAS) industry. Under the agreement, ElectraFly will begin flight testing on Deseret UAS ranges early next year. This watershed moment showcases the strong collaboration between Utah’s state and local governments and its private sector UAS companies.

“As the premier organization in Utah dedicated to UAS, Deseret UAS provides unparalleled access to wide-open land and airspace for companies to test their technologies. We are located close to Utah’s urbanized Wasatch Front and just thirty minutes from the Salt Lake International Airport,” said Deseret UAS Board Chair and Tooele County Commissioner Shawn Milne. “We are delighted that companies like ElectraFly can take advantage of Deseret UAS’ unique assets.”

Founded in 2017, ElectraFly is an aviation company building a hybrid-electric personal flying vehicle. It aims to increase lift capacity and flight times for multirotor aircraft (i.e.- aircraft that can take-off and land vertically) of virtually any size. Its innovations aim to enable multirotors to carry a meaningful load, including personal transportation, supplies, and package delivery. Early personal flight vehicles are operated by a pilot who possesses extensive training and expertise. They are limited in how far they can fly and how heavy their payloads can be. Inefficiencies exist in design, energy use, and battery size. ElectraFly hopes to change that with a prototype that is positioned between technologies like a personal jetpack and a large, helicopter-like air taxi.

“ElectraFly seeks to revolutionize the industry by offering a unique, scalable solution to these problems,” said John Manning, company founder and director of development. “We have developed multirotor capabilities that have the benefits of a fixed wing aircraft, so they can carry more weight over longer distances. We are excited about the partnership with Deseret UAS because we will have access to the best flight-testing opportunities with invaluable expertise and support from leaders in the field.”

The company has an international patent-pending application on numerous innovations. The ElectraFly prototype is being built to carry a rider—something ideal for first responders or military special forces. Other versions will be scaled for air taxi or search and rescue, and smaller versions will be ideal for shipping and package delivery.

“Commercial UAS/UAM companies need Flight Test Ranges to apply their technologies and prove operational performance,” explained Deseret UAS Executive Director Dr. Tulinda Larsen. “The ElectraFly MOU is an example of how Deseret UAS is a game-changer for the industry because we provide Flight Test Ranges designed for safe commercial testing with the necessary FAA authorizations.”

http://www.deseretuas.org/

Published at Wed, 21 Nov 2018 06:44:22 +0000

{articles|100|campaign}Whatever Happened to PrecisionHawk Pathfinder?

* This was written before the DJI and Airmap break up, Red Hat, IBM buy out and Uplift four-person onboarding. Things happen so fast around here; it changes by the day. Red Hat got enough bread from IBM that they could put PH on life-support for just about ever and not bat an eye. So, we’ll just have to see how this whole deal pans out.

Not too long ago this UAV manufacturer was blazing a trail—path-finding if you will—the way to BVLOS. No one knows what happened to all of the promises, however. Attached here is the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRDA) between the FAA and PrecisionHawk from just a few short years ago. ANG-TT-CRDA-313-FEC-F-01

LATAS at the time was heralded a promising solution for working its way through the difficult task of making the Beyond Visual Line Of Sight (BVLOS) a reality. If LATAS would have worked as suggested, it would not only have broken us free from the bounds of the Visual Observer (VO) but could have made the NAS safer for GA and who knows, made the UAM possible too. The FAA offered them a chance at the keys to the proverbial future of aviation kingdom. However, things don’t appear to have worked out because if it had been successful, it would have been worth a whole stable full of unicorns. Don’t think it was all for naught; we did make progress, as Extended Visual Line Of Sight (EVLOS) with a VO is now just considered BVLOS.

Some folks scratched their heads as to why the cellphone carriers just quietly crabbed away from not only the keys but also the whole dang BVLOS UTM kingdom. There have been suggestions that the legal team may have come up to speed on some of the nuisances of aviation liability. Just when we thought old LATAS had fallen off of the radar, a pared down version is now taking over for the LAANC (now UTM) cellphone app developed by Airmap. We can only speculate as to why the DJI would leave the familiarity of this often-touted, most-widely-used airspace app.

Last, we officially heard there was some reorganization going on over there in NC.

Is this just a case of not enough VC money left to paint, but not too proud to whitewash?

I got a boatload of emails, PM, texts, phone calls, and smoke signals from folks purported to be freshly in the “unemployment line” know and from “others” about the P-hawk post-acquisition reorganization. The “stuff” is flying in from all over the World, and it appears that things may not be as rosy as suggested in the hastily-put-together press release.

https://www.suasnews.com/2018/09/precisionhawk-lays-off-40-staff/

There were claims made that some of the folks in a third of the workforce culled were working overtime on verticals that the sales folks were nailing shut! The only reason I could see for cutting the crew is that you’re not making any money on the FARM DRONES, infrastructure, and mapping verticals. What do I know? I’ll be the first to admit that I don’t have an MBA from ASU (Harvard on the Gila), so maybe hiring new people makes more sense (cents)? Golly, I’d just figure paying out huge severance (one pay period for family smacks of success), hiring new people, and training them to do the job of folks that already had tons of experienced may not be the finically sensible thing to do.

It has been suggested by those let go that morale is/was lower than a snake’s belly and management is trying to cut overhead pronto by paying new hires less money. It could be a both/ and thing, but I’d have to do the math on a whiteboard or something to see how it markers out. Does anyone know if you can go back and sharpen the dry erase marker?

From all reports it doesn’t sound like things are all wine and roses with the latest acquisitions, not to mention that the internet rosters of experts have yet to deliver a squadron of “This was their finest hour!” drone pilots. Even the six masters of the skies cannot do the work of forty people, even with a boatload of overtime. Are we to deduce that real data contracts are a little more involved than the lucrative real estate or selfie aerial photography market? All speculation aside, you’d think that a rich smart guy would have already known that Measure had/has those markets locked down padlock!

Word around the transmission tower is that the Florida Light and Power contract may have been underbid and there is a scramble to find some drone acquisition(s) actually turning a profit. Like hens’ teeth, drone business’ turning a profit being as hard to come by in the ecosystem, and if you do find one, harder still to get for a debt-equity swap.

I can tell you that hiring less qualified people to save money on a loser is not a winning strategy. You bite the bullet, pay the hired guns, and plough through the job or let it go. Unless of course, you don’t mind looking like a complete red nose, big-shoe-and-skinny-jean-wearing appclown to your customer.

You won’t hear that kind of real deal from the field talk at the Pivoting Your Way To Profit luncheon at the Commercial Dog and Pony Expo or the InterCarpetbagger drone show. No, instead you can come by the booth and have your picture taken with the lap hyena/morale officer or bonus visionary of your choice. Heck, it may be the same person in some cases, but you are guaranteed to feel like you got your money’s worth. Do you feel better now, man?

Whatever is or isn’t going on in NC, we here at sUAS News are working on trying to get the Pathfinder details from the FAA to see what brand of snake oil was used to grease the purported vaporware skids. I hear that Raleigh is a lot like Silicon Valley where one company bites the dust and the gaggle moves to the next company to try the same strategy that failed at their old company. Rinse, repeat and the next thing

you know you’re failing up at Google, Amazon, or Intel until the burrito string gets cut for good.

Follow @TheDroneDealer on Twitter for more of these types of musing on the daily!

Published at Wed, 21 Nov 2018 05:54:42 +0000

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