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Head Office in North Bay

30 Roundel Road, North Bay, Ontario, P1C 0B8

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The best at what we do..

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Toll Free : 1-866-206-2267

Working Hours

We are happy to meet you during our working hours. Please make an appointment.

  • Monday - Friday08:00-16:30
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A History of Lithium Ion or Hybrid Electric is Your Future of Aviation

By admin In UAV News

11

Sep
2018

A History of Lithium Ion or Hybrid Electric is Your Future of Aviation

Aircraft production has been shifted by electric propulsion. The reason is simple: cables bend.

Gears and shafts don’t. To build helicopter engineers need to design around a mechanical rotating and thick gearbox and clutch which twist to transmit power from the engine to the rotors.

With electric propulsion, power is sent to the propulsors over cables. Wires bend to
Accommodate a design optimized for aerodynamics, safety and ease. Power is provided power is required. This reduces complexity and the weight and frees up space, reducing manufacturing costs and time to market by an order of size. This propulsion by cable is the reason there are so many drone firms now.
As great as electric propulsion seems there’s one issue with it: batteries have nowhere close to the energy necessary for safe flight. multirotors’ designers overlook that one of the main causes of UAV failures is that batteries suddenly run out of power. Today, a aircraft’s flight time is equivalent to the reserve flight period. Nobody who knew the dangers observed by the aviation sector in the past 110 years could fly within an battery-powered vehicle.

So, when are batteries planning to get?

To answer that question, it’s useful to comprehend the history of the batterylife. The battery was first found by M Stanley Whittingham in the 1970s while at Exxon.

Exxon made his battery, however, the battery’s constituents were too expensive and also
Volatile to be forced to a item.

The term Lithium Ion is a class of battery in which lithium ions transfer between anode and the cathode. The makeup of the anode the cathode and the electrolyte dividing both really are what define the different subtypes of batteries. Scientists made several efforts experimenting with cathodes, anodes and electrolytes to make them more economical, safer, and much more reliable, to commercialize Li-ion batteries. In the very first industrial battery being released by Sony in 1991, these advancements triumphed.

Today, almost fifty years later Whittingham’s discovery, lithium ion along with its closely related cousin, lithium polymer (LiPo), have become the overriding battery type for energy-intensive devices from laptops to drones.

The reason that it took so long was due to the number of constraints which batteries need to
Before going into the marketplace satisfy. Energy density is however one constraint that batteries need to satisfy in the aviation market. Batteries must also be safe, powerful, reliable, economical, and long-lasting.

By Way of Example, sulfur cathode lithium contains four times the power stored in a traditional LiPo
Enough to fly an aircraft for a couple of hours, battery. But the issue is they are vulnerable to collapse and have to be replaced after 50 charge-discharge bicycles, and this is far too low for a mission-critical program for example aviation.

Similarly, silicon anode batteries can achieve two to ten times the power density of batteries, however, also have limited charge-discharge cycles and cost thousands of dollars a cell.

Battery technology is science, not engineering, and science always moves at a significantly slower, more pace that is unpredictable. For the aviation industry, this means that there has been a long-range, commercial aircraft many, many years off.

A Hybrid Approach to Aviation

Hybrid-electric propulsion combines the simplicity of electric propulsion and the power density of gas. Today, hybrid multirotors can fly for up to 5 hours and then eliminate the majority of the reliability and maintenance problems associated with gas-powered helicopters (e.g.search engine vibrations, swash plates, and gearboxes, and drive shafts).

Till batteries improve hybrid technology is more than just a compromise. It’s many
For instance, the battery can act as backup power if engine collapse
occurs, eliminating energy reduction as one of the largest contributors to crashes. Other Significant advantages include:

– Fast refuelling/recharging
– Sub-zero temperature operation
– Removing the upkeep and transport of Several batteries
– decreasing battery replacements
– The ability to isolate and soften the engine from the airframe

Though specific simply to aeroplanes, hybrid-electric technology improves fuel economy by bettering the engine (which conserves ) and enables it to operate in its most efficient condition during cruise. Technology may also boost noise pollution by simply running the engine at elevation, far away from people.

While firms such as Opener, Joby, and Uber are currently adhering to electric others have taken notice of the benefits of hybrid technology. Bell Helicopter rolls Royce, and SureFly have released plans for constructing full-scale hybrid VTOL aircraftcarrier. And Zunum Aero (funded by Boeing), NASA and ESAero, Siemens and Airbus have developed or started developing hybrid-electric airplanes.

Each of the above is not to state that batteries will not improve eventually or we shouldn’t invest in battery technology. But for propulsion that is electric-based technology will become the source of power for the future.

Dr. Troy Mestler is currently the CEO of Skyfront, a business which builds hybrid-electric multirotor drones that fly for up to 5 hours.

@Siemens @Airbus @Zee @Opener @Embraer

Why coordination and training is needed for successful integration of UAS into catastrophe management

From Christopher Todd

MIAMI — This past Year ’s hurricane season was a benchmark year for the Part of drones in crisis management.   Harvey, Irma, and Maria had varying characteristics that served well to exhibit the many benefits that unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) could supply for recovery and response operations.   However, the – and publicized — achievement of those attempts is now likely to make a new problemdistant pilots who self-deploy to disaster scenes hoping to save the evening.

The majority of us have been raised on that iconic imagery of the Lone Ranger galloping to trouble on his white horse “Silver. ”  just one person with particular capabilities; Superman, Wonder Woman — whichever icon you choose to use — the narrative is always the same along with also a keen sense.   Disasters are not fiction and the Lone Ranger could turn into an issue for emergency supervisors when he wants somewhere to water his horse in the midst of a response effort.

While many good Samaritan distant pilots believe they can make a positive difference in a catastrophe, the Truth Is that most drone operators don’t possess the fundamental training, abilities, and experience to be truly successful.   UAS disaster operations really are a skill that has to be developed and exercised to become effective during a what’s likely to become an extremely chaotic sequence of events. The FAA Part 107 pilot certification is simply the starting point for those operators who want to become adept at catastrophe response.

The weather immediately following a hurricane is most often deceptively perfect.   Exciting days with clear skies can mislead the uninitiated to a false sense of safety — after Hurricane Irma transferred through Florida in September 29, like what occurred.   What the inexperienced eye didn’t see was that the lack of power, closed the supplies like food and water available at those shops that were really open following the storm available hotel rooms, along with gas stations.   Mobile communications were either lose or hit, meaning if you needed emergency assistance a cell phone could or may be of any assistance to you.

Trying to enter restricted areas such as the Florida Keys or portions of Collier county became essentially impossible for those without official credentials from a legitimate public safety or government service, or from a Crucial infrastructure provider like a power or telecommunications company working to restore services.   Unless of course you were willing to risk the ire of the law enforcement and National Guard employees holding assault rifles at the roadblock.

That Good Samaritan who just travelled several hours to save the occupants of the Florida Keys now discovered themselves parked on the side of US 1 with no petrol, no hotel area, and likely no ability to make a call.   The only place they could go was an emergency shelter to find space and some food on the ground. In essence, they merely became part of the issue, rather than a portion of the solution.

One of the first classes of crisis management would be to never self-deploy.   At the Airborne Response and the Airborne International Response Team (AIRT) — our 501(c)3 nonprofit organizationwe train our distant pilots on this basic premise.   Our pilots understand about the range of major disaster response operations.

They understand how to prep their gear package sentences which will allow them, before a storm. They learn how to integrate into NIMS and ICS rather than looking for the tree that when they’re advised to report to & ldquo; Logs & rdquo; they even locate the logistics section.

Then they wait patiently.   They wait patiently for the call.   Every storm along with every catastrophe have its own nuances that distinguish it.   With hurricanes; dimensions, speed, strength, and area are variables which will determine the range of the response effort and if extra UAS teams are necessary.

The Nation of North Carolina appears to be ahead of the curve in their own attempt to mount a coordinated drone response.   This is an example of a effort with an official state source to supply a coordinated UAS response for incidents such as Hurricane Florence.

Rather than hurrying ahead of the Carolinas, educated and responsible remote pilots will take this time to pause and strategy.   There is a function for pilots that are distant to play in the disaster response and recovery operations. They trick is to combine an organization which will help teach and instruct you to react effectively so that that you can make a huge difference.  

Two of those organizations are the Airborne International Response Team (AIRT: http://airt.ngo) along with the Center for Robotic-Assisted Search and Rescue (CRASAR: http://crasar.org). Each organization has a proven history of working with first responders and government agencies to integrate UAS flight groups, as well as training volunteer distant pilots.

As Hurricane Florence barrels upwards toward the Carolina shore, starry-eyed drone pilots with dreams of grandeur Should provide themselves a reality test.   Are you preparing to be part of the issue or part of the solution?

The whole unmanned technologies industry is hoping that you make the appropriate choice.

About Christopher Todd

Chris is currently a FAA-certified Remote Pilot who has operated unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) during the day and nighttime disaster response operations. He’s a U.S. Coast Guard trained search and rescue teacher who specializes in high risk missions and has operated UAS in coordinated flight evolutions with manned rescue aircraft, as well as internationally with overseas government entities.   Chris serves as the manager of the AUVSI Miami Satellite Chapter, as well as the chair of the Miami-Dade Beacon Council&rsquo.

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